who's next?

The past few months I've struggled with working consistently on any one project.   Bouncing from embroidering to piecing, to quilting, to knitting.  None of my works in progress are getting the attention they deserve.  It's kind of driving me crazy.  I have a couple of new projects in mind, but I dread having one join the stack. arabic lattice partial blocksThis is where I'm at with my Arabic Lattice quilt.  It's a hand piecing project that is going to be a large quilt.  Hand piecing is a one block at time process that I love, so I'm cool with how long it will take to get this from block to quilt top.  It's just that there are a lot of blocks left so I'm setting this one aside for a while.  I have another hand piecing project with paper pieced hexies.  It's so low on the list it's packed up for now.  I also tested an applique block that I'm dying to make some more of, but again, packed up for now.

partial spider web blocksThese are my spider web blocks.  A spider web quilt has been on my to stitch list for a mighty long time.  I'm machine stitching the blocks and plan on hand quilting this one.  These blocks are foundation pieced on to muslin.  The stack in the back is the triangles I still need to make.  I was thinking of focusing on this quilt top but then realized I couldn't hand quilt anything until I finish my paris embroidery.

haptic-paris.jpgMy Paris map haptic lab is on my quilting rack right now.  To be honest, it's been there for quite a while.  It's a massive embroidery project that I plan to use as a wall hanging.  I've finished up the left bank and am working my way through the right.  In order for anything else to be quilted, this has to be done.  The paper pattern on the top is fragile and starting to wear in spots so I'm officially moving it to the top of the list.

So once I have Paris done, it should be smooth sailing through the rest of my projects, right?

golden afternoon quilt

I'm doing my best to keep my priorities intact.  I miss this space and thought a quilt finish was just the excuse to get back here. golden-afternoon-quilt

I had to go back through my instagram feed to see how long this quilt top sat finished before I had it quilted.  It was almost a year.  I can't believe I let it sit for that long.

golden-afternoon-quilt-detailIt was long arm quilted with swirls in a turquoise thread.  I love everything about this quilt.  The fabric is Jeni's Dreaming Vintage line.  I'm generally not one to go for warm colors but I love how all of these colors look together.  It's such a happy group of prints.  The pattern is Golden Afternoon, also by Jeni.  I bound the quilt with two shades of green and backed it with a sewing machine print that coordinates in the very best way.

golden-afternoon-quilt-backI'm keeping this quilt for myself.  I'm greedy like that.


pair of ice dyed quilts

I think the main reason my projects don't find there way here is that I just don't stop and take pictures like I used to.  In May, I made a fabric basket for a friend's birthday.  The pattern was from Anna's book, Handmade Style.  I was so happy with how it turned out that I snapped a quick pic with my phone and delivered it right away.  Later, I thought I would write a little post about it and then realized that all I had to share was this. Processed with VSCO with e8 presetOne lonely photo.  With this in mind, I took some time to photograph a couple of quilts I made last fall.

ice dye log cabin on barnI could make log cabin quilts for days.  This one is a baby size quilt made from one giant log cabin block.

ice dye log cabin sideice dye log cabin on doorOne half is a light weight chambray, the other half is a split of ice dyed cottons in greens and purples.

The back is a print with indigo stripes on a off-white background.

ice dye log cabin quilt backice dye Vast quiltThe pattern for this quilt is Vast from Jeni's book, Patchwork Essentials: The Half-Square Triangle.

ice dye vast quilt detail

It's made with some of my favorite ice dyed cottons and a mid-weight chambray.  The back is a gold and black print.

ice dyed Vast quilt back

I think this quilt looks brilliant with all the lichen on the wall.

ice dyed Vast quilt on wall

cotton and steel star quilt

Processed with VSCOcam with e8 presetI finished this larger than life quilt last spring. It was a commission project and it tested the limits of my small house.  By the time I stitched the last border on I couldn't lay it flat on the floor anymore.  Needless to say, it was quilted on a long arm.

star quilt quilting detailI love the swoopy spiral quilting.

I used Jeni's Giant Vintage Star Quilt tutorial for the center and then added borders to bump it out to a king size.  The eight small corner blocks in the borders were foundation pieced.  I used a half size version of Faith's Summer Sampler Star tutorial.  The front is a mix of cotton + steel fabrics and a super girly pink was requested for the back.

star quilt back

I don't know that it can really get much more girly pink than that!

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lost time

I miss this space.  I really do.  It's difficult to make it a priority but at the same time regret not capturing so many moments and projects over the past couple of years. black knit hat

I finished a hat last week.  The pattern is the simple pleasures hat from purl soho knit with blue sky alpaca royal in antique black.  It is the softest yarn with which I have ever worked.  After I finished it, I thought it would be fun to look back on all of my knitting projects I have done over the years.  Only to realize I hadn't photographed most of them, let alone posted most of the recent ones.

In October, I made a pair of color block mittens for a friend's birthday.

color block mittens

I lost my favorite black and white striped mittens last spring so I made myself a new set of mittens in purples and greys.  I adapted a glove pattern to make these.

Processed with VSCOcam with e8 preset

I made a couple of hats for myself and for lulu this past fall.  One of lulu's has already gone through the washer and dryer and on to the trash.  The other was a replacement yarnster since her first stretched to the point it didn't fit anymore.

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let's talk soon

snow dye fabric in the shop

It's always a challenge for me to get back in the groove once school starts up and I have more time to call my own.  There are so many things that I want to get done, but I can't do them all at once despite my best efforts to do so. I did manage to fit some snow dyeing into my schedule this weekend.  They are filled with shades of blue and hints of brown with some yellow tossed in for good measure.

blue snow dye panel

I have listed some one yard cuts in the shop.  They could be cut up to make totes or used for quilting.  They would make for a great background for a haptic lab constellation quilt too.


I also cut up and put together some bundles of smaller cuts of fabrics for the shop too.  I'm hoping everyone enjoys sewing with these fabrics as much as I do.  Fingers crossed I will get caught up on my to do list so I can work on my to sew list!


stray postsmybricole
tiny shop update
sunny days caravan tote zipper
sunny days caravan tote zipper

I have added a few totes to my shop.  The weather is finally starting to cool down.  Thank goodness for cardigan weather!  It was too hot to ice dye for quite a stretch there.

Hopefully, I will be able to get some new fabric ready to go in the next few weeks.  If there is interest, I was thinking of adding some yardage and bundles of some of my dyed fabric to the shop.

School starts next week so that should free up some time for me to get to work on my project list.  As much as a dread the idea of using an alarm clock again, I'm looking forward to some uninterrupted stitching time.

Citizens of Textile sale this weekend
go anywhere totes
go anywhere totes

I'm one of this month's featured artists over at Citizens of Textile this month.

I've made a small collection of totes, some zippered pouches, and a couple of special baby quilts.  Each piece uses some of the snow dyed cotton I made late this winter.

snow dye baby quilt
snow dye baby quilt

The range of shades and values created with the snow dye process are pretty inspiring.  It's made for a fun one a kind group of projects that I'm so excited to share.

detail of buckskin caravan tote
detail of buckskin caravan tote

The Citizens of Textile shop is open through Sunday night 7pm CST.


campfire messenger bag

campfire messenger bag frontI'm sure it will come to no surprise to you when I say I'm a big fan of Anna's patterns.  Her step by step explanations make what might be a nerve-wracking actually completely doable.  Things like strap extenders and snaps are actually kind of easy when broken down step by step.  Even the inset zipper went in like a breeze! campfire messenger bag inside

I used a natural linen for the exterior and some of the sugar resist cotton I dyed last summer for the flap and binding.  It's lined with Summersville which always makes me smile when I see it.

This pattern is part of the Bag of the Month Club.  There are some amazing patterns available.  You should definitely check them out.

campfire messenger bag side

I would say I'm looking forward to using this bag but I don't think I'll get to.  I used it one day, but lulu saw my things in it and wondered why I was using her bag.  She said that was fine for the day, but my time is up and I think it's all hers now.  I really can't blame her.

the fantastic quilt voyage begins

fantastic quilt voyage blockI have never been a part of a traveling quilt project before, so when Jacey invited me to be a part of her fantastic quilt voyage project I was mixed with fear and excitement.  The idea is you make one block to start your own quilt and then it's shipped around to one of the other participants, who in turn make a block and send it on to the next quilter.  Once everyone has made a block it comes home and you can put together a quilt top.  Most of us are on pinterest and we've been busy pinning all sorts of inspiration for our quilts.  Using pinterest has been a great way to really focus on what you are hoping for your own quilt and also get a feel for what would work for someone else. fantastic quilt voyage packet

Some of us are also sending along a journal/blank book of some sort for all of us to write in as we work on a block.  I ended up making a sort of a journal pack with mini copies of the pins I found for inspiration and punched ovals from paint chips for color palette matching.  There are also some fabric scraps along with a clip to hold the journal cards that people put together as they work on the project.

fantastic quilt voyage box

I used a box from Fat Quarter Shop for shipping (they always use such sturdy boxes) but I thought I should do something to make sure people knew it wasn't being sent from Fat Quarter Shop.  I didn't want anyone to walk out to the mailbox and think "did I order a big box of fabric and completely forget about it?"  It could happen, right?!  So I doodled all around the box in the hopes no one has a panic attack on their front step.

Even though it's months away, I'm already looking forward to putting together my quilt!

five quilts, one post

Last year I set myself up with a long project list.  By mid-year I had started several quilts but hadn't finished most of them so by December I was determined to cross some off the list.  blue sky geese quilt  

The idea for sky blue geese came from a doodle in my notebook.  It has blue and ivory cross-hatch print flying geese blocks surrounded by text prints.  I sent it as a surprise to a friend I haven't seen in years.

back of sky blue geese quilt

The back is mix of prints.  The blue and white plumes were a favorite of mine.  They've been in my stash for years so it's great to see them in a project.

silver star quilt

I made a couple of Christmas quilts in December.  I used a scaled down version of Jeni's Giant Vintage Star Tutorial. They were also given to friends.

gold star quilt

One was a large silver star, the other gold.

florette quilt

Florette turned out to be one of my favorite quilts to date.  The pattern is by Jeni Baker.

florette quilt detail

Anna, Jeni, and I took a screen printing class ages ago and while they were here they helped me pull fabrics for future projects.  It was a blast to spend hours happily geeking out over fabric with friends.  I used one of the stacks we put together for this quilt.   Then I finished the top while we were on a sewing retreat together.

back of florette quilt

The back is one part, grey and white paisley and one part, floral.  Truth be told...the floral was our old shower curtain.  I made the curtain a few years ago and saved the fabric when I made a new one.  I had intended to sell this quilt, but in the end, I surprised lulu by putting it on her bed while she was in school.  She nearly fell down the steps to thank me because she was so happy.  (that would have been an awkward ER visit!)

golden geese quilt

Golden geese was another quilt I intended to sell.  It was also a stack that Anna and Jeni helped pull together.  The pattern is of my own design. I love the fabrics, so much print on print on print.  I just couldn't part with it.  I have greedily kept it for myself.  (that's how i roll)

back of golden goose quilt

It's backed with some fabric from my stash.  It felt great to check all of these of my project list.

I'm looking forward to sharing more about this year's list.

little apples quilt

front of little apples quiltI finished a bunch of quilts last month.  It was an effort to work through a good chunk of my 2014 project list before I started my 2015 list. side of little apples print

This quilt went together extra quick.  It's made with a pre-cut layer cake and then some yardage for the back.  The prints on the front are all for Aneela Hoey's little apples line.  I love the trees and little hedgehogs.  The wardrobe print is one of my all-time favorite fabrics.   I machine quilted it with a pale grey thread with organic matchstick lines along the diagonals.

back of little apples quilt

I added some coordinating cardinals to the back.  They just looked so cute with the rest of the prints.

I've listed in my etsy shop and I'm hoping it finds a nice new home with someone who loves it as much as I do.

little apples quilt

scrappy bear paw quilt

scrappy bear paw quilt on door In January, Dana started a scrappy bear paw quilt-along on Instagram.  I love making bear paws blocks and had a stack of fabric that I had set aside for myself ages ago.  It was a mix of old fabrics that I had been saving just for me, along with new prints that caught my eye.  Once I saw Dana's quilt a-long, I knew I had to get started right away.

corner of scrappy bear paw quilt

I gave one paw in each block an accent paw.  In the end, it turned out to be a sampler quilt hidden in a bear paw quilt and I absolutely love it.  As soon as it was finished I had it on the bed.

detail of scrappy bear paw

The border is the Paris map print by three sisters for Moda.  It's from years ago but I squirreled away yards of it because it is one of my most favorite prints.  It was my jumping off point for the prints for the rest of the quilt.  Basically, all my favorite colors, which are mostly sort of non-colors.

front of scrappy bear paw quilt

One of my favorite bits is the binding.  In with one of my favorite text prints, I added sections of a black print from the first fat quarter bundle I ever purchased back in 1997.  It is a Moda print and I still love it today as much as I did back then.

scrappy binding

The back of the quilt is a lovely black print on double wide fabric with some grey around the edges.

back corner of scrappy bear paw quilt


A friend quilted it for me on her long arm.  The quilting pattern was called bayside.  I'm sure they were going for waves, but to me it looked like thick curly bear fur so I had to try it.

scrappy bear paw on wall

She did an amazing job and I'm thrilled with how it turned out.

scrappy bear paw quilt on door at distance


mybricole on etsy update

four 241 totes I had a etsy shop years ago under the name bricole.  Back then, my shop was bricole, my blog was bricole at home and my tumblr was mybricole. (remember tumblr??  I still use it, true story)

At that time, you couldn't change your etsy shop name so once I settled on mybricole, I set up a second empty shop to hold the name.  Then etsy decided you could change your name, but only once and I would have to delete the other shop first and hope I timed everything right to be able to then change the name and to be perfectly honest I just didn't trust the internet enough to go through all of that.  I closed my first shop and now I'm using mybricole on etsy as my online shop.

mustang 241 on brick wall

A few people have been asking when I would be making totes for sale again and I'm pleased to finally be able to say, now.

arrow go anywhere tote on barn

I have a bunch of new bags listed and will hopefully be adding more in a month or two.  They are made with a mix of cottons and linens in all my favorite prints. Including a few hard to find prints that were painful for me to cut in to.  Through the results were worth it.  The fabrics really stand out on these bags.  I used several of Anna's patterns to make them.

apple 241 on stone wall

Be sure to check out all the new listings!

around the block quilt

front of around the block quiltThis was one of the those quick projects that took me ages to finish.  The colors are not ones I usually work with so I had a difficult time deciding how the blocks should work together.  I shuffled them around so many times.  I kind of hated it and then I loved it. corner of around the block quilt

The heart of each log cabin block was part of a panel that I cut up and then edged with wonky bands of tone on tone orange, green, blue, and gold.  The orange is a cross hatch print, while the others are silhouettes of leaves.

The extra spaces around the blocks and the binding are a coordinating brown print that I think looks like little bees buzzing around, but is actually tiny airplanes.  I quilted it with gold thread in vertical straight lines.

back of around the block quiltThe back is big, wide bands of the coordinating colors that I used on the front.  aorund the block quilt

I think it makes for a great baby quilt.  I'm happy that in the end I powered through and kept working on this one.  It would have been a shame to let it sit on a shelf unfinished simply because it was bit frustrating in the middle of making it.

It will be listed soon.


summer indigo

indigo brushed and dipped with sugar syrup resist When I started this post I was going to link back to the tote I made with cotton I dyed last year with indigo.  Then I realized I never shared it here, only on instagram.

Luxe Tote in indigo and buckskin

It's the Luxe Tote pattern.  The handles and corners are buckskin.  The tote went together quickly and I will be making another one at some point, I'm sure.

I also wanted to take another try at indigo dying.  I love the shibori technique of long running stitches pulled tight and knotted.  That was how I created the fabric that was used for the tote.  I did a couple of pieces like that again.

indigo string shibori

I love the random shapes created by the tightening of the stitches.

I used some wooden drawer knobs and rubber bands for these.

indigo round drawer knobs as resist

I can't decide if I like the front or the back better with this pattern.   I also did a slow dip on a skein of wool.

indigo dyed yarn

I'm anxious to start knitting with this.

I won a copy of Visual Texture on Fabric a couple of years ago.  It's filled with great DIY ways to create texture on fabrics, many with things you probably already have on hand.

indigo brushed with sugar syrup resist

I used the sugar syrup method for these.  I scattered a lot of syrup at first in an attempt to create layers of color.  The longer the syrup sets, the more it will resist in the dying process.  My syrup was also thin, so it spread a bit leaving shadow lines around the white patterns.  I let the syrup set on the fabric for about an hour the first round and then used an old paint brush to apply the indigo.  Once the indigo oxidized, I rinsed it and scattered more syrup, waited, and rinsed.  I kept going with this process until I was happy with the color.  It was difficult to get that true indigo with the brush application, so I did a quick dip in the vat on a couple of yards.

indigo brush and dip with sugar syrup resist

I love the richness of color that appears after the dip.  I'm looking forward to cutting into these for more totes and maybe even a quilt.

indigo with string shibori resist

calico plus log cabin equals my barn raising quilt

Big quilts are tough to photograph.  I have used this spot in the past for big quilts.  The steps are a big help, but the wind can be a big problem.  I love the small feet trying to hold the corner from blowing back on this one.

Thankfully, just when we thought all hope was lost, we stopped at the park.

This quilt was two years in the making.  The calicoes are from Liberty Lifestyle's Bloomsbury collection.  I fell in love with them the first moment I saw them.  As a child of the 70's, I was raised on calico.  My mom made dresses with pinafores for me that were a blend of Little House on the Prairie meets 1970's bold.

calico dress
calico dress

Once I picked out the fabrics, the pattern was an easy decision.  I love log cabin quilts.  From traditional to wonky, they let simple blocks shine with all the different options for layouts.  Plus they are a part of my history.  Around the time that picture of me, along with my brother, in our finest 70's looks, our new log house was being built.  I grew up in a log house.  It's an L-shaped ranch style, but it's still a log house.

Log cabins have become my comfort block.  As soon as I finish one, I want to make another one.  Which is good because it took a whole lot of blocks to make this quilt.  The back is pieced with brown florals and paisley medallions.

I used flannel instead of batting for a lighter weight, but with as much fabric as is used in a quilt of this size, there's not a lot about this quilt that is light weight.  I used a heavy weight pearl cotton in ivory to tie the layers together.  It's already on the bed and I should add, over the bed.  It pools onto the floor around our full-sized bed.

This is one of those projects that I thought might never be finished.


I am so happy that it finally is after all this time.

apple custard pie

apple basket You know how some foods just send you back in time?  This pie is definitely one of those foods for me.  We didn't have air conditioning when I was a kid and Lodi apples ripen in mid July, when it's usually pretty hot and humid outside.  It made for an exceptionally hot day in the kitchen with the oven on, but we didn't complain because we knew before long we would sit at the table, under the ceiling fan, eating slice upon slice of pie, more than likely with vanilla ice cream on the side.

pie edge

The filling is my maternal grandmother's recipe.  She was a top-notch cook.  Her fried chicken was unlike any others, I've mentioned her angelfood cake before, and her chocolate cake recipe is the reason my husband married me (true story).  Her apple pie has become a summer time staple for our family. Tart apples in a bed of sugary custard in a pie crust...what could be bad about that?  I can remember my mom making two of these at time for dessert and there would still be just a small sliver or two left by morning if we were lucky and there were only 4 of us in the house!

lodi apple in orchard

I always use Lodi apples for this pie.  I have tried other varieties for the recipe but haven't had much luck finding another one that works as well.  Thankfully, there is an orchard nearby that still has a few trees so we always pick up some every July.  The kids and I picked two baskets this morning.

picking apples

Cj suggested we divide them, one basket for making pies, one basket for him to eat.  I think you would be hard pressed to find another person who likes to eat tart apples more than he does.

rolling out crust

apple custard pie

for the crust

This recipe makes enough for 2 pies, but half can be wrapped in cling wrap and frozen for another day.

2 1/2 cups flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup (2 sticks) cold butter cut into small pieces

1/4 to 1/2 cup ice water

Put the flour, salt, and cold butter in bowl of food processor.  Process until it resembles a course meal.

Add ice water, spoonful by spoonful, through the tube with the machine running, just until the dough holds together without being wet or sticky; do NOT over process.

Split the dough in half and shape into a disc on a piece of plastic wrap and then wrap it up.  Chill the dough you will be using today for one hour and freeze the extra disc of dough for another day (like tomorrow)

Once chilled, lightly flour your workspace and roll dough to 1/8 inch thickness.  Place in pan and chill while you get the filling and the apples ready.  Preheat oven to 425 degrees.

for the filling

In a bowl, mix together:

1 cup sugar

3 Tablespoons flour

1 teaspoon cinnamon

(If you are using a large pie pan, use 1 1/2 cup sugar and 4 Tablespoons flour and 1 teaspoon cinnamon)

Peel and core 6 Lodi apples and cut into chunks.  Place in a single layer on the UNbaked pie cruse.  Sprinkle the sugar mixture over the top.

Fill to the bevel of the pie pan with milk.  Place in oven.  I bake mine on a cookie sheet, just in case it bubbles over.  Plus that gives me a place to bake the left over strips of pie crust (sprinkled with cinnamon sugar before baking).

Bake in 425 degree oven for 15 minutes.  Reduce heat to 350 degrees and bake for 45-50 minutes.

side of pie slice

the black and color quilt
black and color block of the month quilt
black and color block of the month quilt

I started writing this post in my head this morning while I was taking these pictures in the back yard.  It was sort of a sad post, dwelling on how disappointed I was with how the color transferred in the dryer.  I'm still bummed about it, but in between then and now, I had a visit with my new massage therapist.  When she heard I did a lot of sewing she did some extra work on my arms.  As someone who spends a lot of time holding projects and stitching with my hands, I shouldn't be surprised to feel how much tension she worked out of my forearms, but I was.  Turns out I don't just hold my tension in my neck and upper back.  Needless to say, I'm feeling relaxed and much more at peace with this project.

It's the Craftsy Block of the Month from 2012.  YES, 2012.  I started working on Amy's class in January of 2012 and just finished it this week.  More proof of how far behind I am on my works in progress list. I used Gee's Bend Solids for the entire quilt top. It's a group of cottons with the softest hand.  They are hand dyed solids, which, while it creates a gorgeous variation in color, also creates a less stable one. I treated a stack of the fabrics with Retayne and Synthrapol to help them hold their color. Unfortunately, because I took so long to finish the blocks some untreated black ended up in a couple of the blocks. (note to self...treat fabric as soon as it enters the house)

I was nervous to wash it knowing there were some rogue untreated pieces of the black fabric in the mix so I threw in 3 color catchers and crossed my fingers. I ran down to the washer when I heard the end of cycle buzz and was thrilled to see all the bright colors were still holding their own. Woohoo! I tossed it in the dryer and away I went.  Then the dryer buzzed and I ran down.  I was crushed.  When I pulled it out of the dryer I found the yellows and pinks where now smudged with black. As the quilt tumbled, the black spread itself all over. I had this happen with another quilt, and with washings it diminished, so I tossed this one in with 3 three more color catchers and here's where it stands.

Still smudged.

From a distance it looks great. It's like a fellow student once said of my work during a critique in a university drawing class, "if you step back and half close your eyes, it is perfect". (I wasn't insulted, he was British so his accent allowed him to get away with even the most thinly veiled insults.  Plus, he said it was "perfect", right?!)

So it is our new family quilt. You know the one that gets thrown in the back of the car and used to for anything and everything.   And it will be the coolest car quilt around!  I love the feel of the fabric, so soft and smooth.  Plus aside from the smudges, it's a pretty awesome set of blocks!  It's backed with a black and blue print so grass stains won't  a problem.

Bring on the picnics!  We are ready!